Roasted Salmon with Ratatouille

Roasted Salmon with Ratatouille

I assumed my four-pound November/December weight gain would relegate me to average American statistical data. It turns out I’m wrong.

According to a scientific article in The New England Journal of Medicine, the average weight an American puts on over the holidays is about one pound. That doesn’t sound so bad, but the article continues by reporting most people don’t ever lose that one pound of weight — that can add up.

Each pound added to my girth was done so with cognoscente enthusiasm; I plan to shed each and every one of them in the same spirit, which does not translate to denying myself delicious food. In my vocabulary, “diet” is a four-letter word, a noun translating to “denial” that should never be uttered aloud. Extra time at the gym, combined with an abundance of vegetables, grains, lean proteins and healthy fats should help shed the weight I gained.

I looked for one dish that incorporated many vegetables and found a recipe in Fine Cooking Magazine for ratatouille, a French vegetable stew. This recipe includes ingredients typical to most ratatouilles: eggplant, zucchini, peppers, tomatoes and onion. The recipe is atypical because the author chose to roast instead of simmer or sauté the vegetables for the stew. I like this suggestion as I prefer the technique of roasting, which concentrates each vegetable’s unique flavor profile.

The best ratatouille’s are made at summer’s end with local tomatoes, eggplant, onion and zucchini. But this January ratatouille, using Florida and California vegetables, is filled with the sunny flavors of summer. The Fine Cooking recipe uses fresh tomatoes, but I prefer using a good canned whole tomato at this time of the year, and this was one of the changes I made.

Ratatouille keeps a good week, refrigerated, so I made one large recipe insuring I’d have leftovers in the coming days. I plan to toss the ratatouille with pasta one evening; another night make bruschetta. To make this Italian treat, I’ll spoon ratatouille over whole grain artisan bread slices, top them with grated cheese, and then run the bread under the broiler.

My husband’s birthday is next week, and he’s requested Lamb in Puff Pastry for a special dinner. Life is a balancing act, so puff pastry and butter will find themselves next to bulghur and broccoli in tomorrow’s shopping cart. Every good boy deserves favor.

Recipe: Roasted Salmon with Ratatouille

Ingredients

  • 2 small onions (approx. 5 ounces each), cut into 1/4-inch-thick half moons
  • 2 bell peppers (any color), seeds and membranes removed and sliced
  • 1 medium eggplant (apx. 1 pound), peeled if desired and cut into 1/2-inch thick slices
  • 2 zucchini (7-8 ounces), sliced into 1/2-inch rounds
  • 15 whole garlic cloves (medium-sized), peeled
  • 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 (28 ounce can) whole tomatoes, drained and cut into large pieces
  • 1/2 cup torn or chopped basil
  • 2 pounds center cut fresh salmon fillet
  • Zest and juice from 1 lemon

Instructions

  1. Position two racks in the top and bottom third of oven. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line two large baking sheets with foil.
  2. Toss onion, eggplant, pepper and zucchini with 1/3 cup olive oil. In one layer, spread vegetables over baking sheets. Lightly season with kosher salt and place in oven.
  3. Roast 25 minutes then remove from oven. Stir vegetables, then stir in add garlic cloves and divide tomatoes between the 2 pans.
  4. Return to oven, and continue roasting until vegetables are very tender, an additional 20 minutes. Remove from oven, transfer ratatouille to a bowl, toss with basil and season to taste with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper. Tent with foil to retain heat.
  5. Place salmon on one of the baking sheets and brush with remaining olive oil and lemon juice. Lightly season with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper. Place on higher oven rack and roast until desired level of doneness, 10-15 minutes.
  6. Divide salmon into 4 pieces and top with ratatouille. Garnish with lemon zest and serve.

Active Time: 40 minutes

Roast Time (includes salmon): 1 hour

Number of servings (yield): 4

Copyright © Peggy Lampman’s dinnerFeed.

More Recipes Filed Under "Creative leftovers"

One Response to Roasted Salmon with Ratatouille

  1. Zita Woodrum says:

    Bulgur for human consumption is usually sold parboiled and dried, with only a very small amount of the bran partially removed. Bulgur is recognized as a whole grain by the U.S.D.A. and the Whole Grains Council. Bulgur is sometimes confused with cracked wheat, which is crushed wheat grain that has not been parboiled. Whole-grain, high-fiber bulgur and cracked wheat can be found in natural food stores, Middle Eastern specialty grocers, and some traditional grocery stores..

    All the best
    http://www.caramoan.co

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